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Changes to sick pay rules from April 2019

In absence, Employment law, Uncategorized on April 11, 2019 at 12:27 pm

As of 6th April 2019 entitlement to sick pay is changing. The amount employees need to earn in order for Statutory Sick Pay to apply is rising from £116 per week to £118. The rate of pay will also increase by £2.20 to £94.25 per week.

As before employees need to have been off work sick for 4 or more days in a row (including non-working days) to qualify and SSP can be paid for up to 28 weeks.

 

If you would like guidance on managing absence in your workplace, contact us at Rob Bryan Associates Limited Main Office: 01462 732444  www.robbryanassociates.org.uk

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5 Important Employment Law updates in April 2019

In Uncategorized on February 28, 2019 at 11:34 am

April 2019

1. New minimum wage rates

The National Living Wage (NLW) and National Minimum Wage (NMW) are set to rise in April.
The new rates will be:

  • NLW (25+) – £8.21 per hour
  • NMW for 21-24-year-olds – £7.70 per hour
  • NMW for 18-20-year-olds – £6.15 per hour
  • NMW for 16-17-year-olds – £4.35 per hour
  • NMW apprentice rate – £3.90 per hour

Employers with staff earning the NLW or NMW, or close to it should check what adjustments need to be made ready for April.

 

2. Increases in statutory sick pay, maternity, paternity, adoption and shared parental pay

  • Statutory sick pay will rise to £94.25 per week
  • Statutory maternity, paternity, adoption, and shared parental payments will rise to £148.68 per week
  • Accommodation offset will rise to £7.55 per day

 

3. New statutory compensation rates

  • the limit on the daily amount of statutory guarantee pay will increase from £28 to £29
  • the limit on the amount of the unfair dismissal compensatory award will rise from £83,682 to £86,444 (there is an additional cap of one year’s gross salary on the compensatory award)
  • the minimum basic award for certain unfair dismissals will go up from £6,203 to £6,408.
  • The main change is that the amount of a “week’s pay” for calculating statutory redundancy pay and certain unfair dismissal awards is to go up from £508 to £525 from 6 April 2019. The maximum unfair dismissal compensatory award will increase from £83,682 to £86,444 and the limit on the daily amount of statutory guarantee pay will rise from £28 to £29.

 

4. Workplace Pension Auto-enrolment increases

  • The minimum contribution will now be a total of 8%. The employer minimum contribution will be 3%.
Date Employer minimum contribution Total minimum contribution
Currently, from 6 April 2018 to 5 April 2019 2% 5% (including 3% staff contribution)
6 April 2019 onwards 3% 8% (including 5% staff contribution)

5.  Payslips

  • Changes to the way employers issue payslips will also come into force on 6th April 2019 as from this date onwards the legal right to a payslip will be extended to include those who are recognised as ‘workers’.
  • Employers are required to:
  • provide payslips to all workers
  • show hours on payslips where the pay varies by the amount of time worked
  • Employers should work with their payroll departments to ensure that correct procedures are in place by April.

Mental Health in the Workplace

In Uncategorized on February 14, 2019 at 10:32 am

Let's talk about mental healthAround 25% of workers in the UK will suffer from poor mental health at some point in their working life. The cost to business, work teams, workers and their families is high.
As a manger or business owner what can you do to support your workers and aid recovery?

Recognise the issue
If you employ enough people for long enough then you will, if you haven’t already, encounter a worker with a mental health problem. Be prepared and informed. Find out about the 6 standards that the HSE have identified as factors in workplace stress.

Talk
This doesn’t have to be a direct question about their mental health – try to find out what circumstances are impacting them within the workplace. The HSE standards can be used as a framework for your discussion. Look for ways you can support and assist. You may be able to communicate some of your observations but remember that it is not a disciplinary hearing. Make sure you agree a date to talk again. It may take a number of discussions before an employee is willing to open up.

Plan a recovery programme
Recovery periods in cases of mental health can be uncertain and each person is different. Obtain a report from the worker’s GP and include specific advice in your plan. Record what steps are agreed and put in dates for review.

Create a supportive working environment
Improve your awareness and knowledge – promotion of well-being is as important as assisting with recovery. You could also look into offering an Employee Assistance Programme (EAP).
Be aware of unusual patterns of absence, behaviour or productivity as these can be signs of an issue.
A temporary period of flexibility may help.
Some larger organisations have well-being ‘first-aiders’ a person can approach if they are feeling overwhelmed.

Let’s be knowledgeable and prepared to tackle these issues and let us have the courage to act on what we see around us and create a workplace that can support those working within it.

For more resources to help you approach Mental Health see our website.

New Rights for Bereaved Parents

In Uncategorized on October 2, 2018 at 10:26 am

For the first time parents who suffer the loss of a child will have a legal right to time off work and, subject to eligibility, statutory bereavement pay.

two person holding hands while sitting on grey cushionThe Parental Bereavement (Leave and Pay) Act 2018 was given royal assent on 13 September 2018 and is expected to come into force in April 2020.

The Act will offer, as a day one right, two weeks’ leave to any employed parents who lose a child under the age of 18 or who suffer a stillbirth after 24 weeks of pregnancy. Employees will also be eligible for statutory bereavement pay if they meet certain criteria, including that they have been employed for at least 26 weeks, and have given the correct notice.

Currently, employees are entitled to a reasonable amount of unpaid time off following a bereavement.

Will Quince MP, who first brought the issue to Parliament in a Ten-Minute Rule motion said:

There can be few worse life experiences than the loss of a child and while most employers treat their staff with dignity and compassion when this tragedy occurs, all too often we have heard stories of grieving parents being forced back to work too early.

I am delighted that parents in this awful situation will now have the protection of paid leave enshrined in law, and we should be very proud that the UK now has one of the best worker’s rights in this area in the world.

Action:

Whilst many employers would be sensitive to a bereavement of a child, this legislation is setting out mandatory obligations. This is a good example for having a clear written policy ahead of time.

Once the regulations for the implementation of the Act are published, employers should review their policies and procedures regarding bereavement to ensure compliance. If you would like advice on implementing this legislation, contact us at Rob Bryan Associates Limited Main Office: 01462 732444  www.robbryanassociates.org.uk

RBA Autumn Newsletter

In Uncategorized on September 5, 2018 at 10:23 am

Newsletter

Our Autumn edition addresses issues around immigration and Brexit, the EHRC report on sexual harassment in the light of the #MeToo campaign, new guidance on overtime as well as recent cases of interest.

As ever, if there is a topic that you wish to specifically address in your own business, we will be only too happy to talk through your options for change and implementation. Past newsletter updates are available at robbryanassociates.org.uk.

If you would like to sign up to receive our newsletter direct to your inbox please email sarah@robertbryan.co.uk

Employee screening – are you up to date with changes to DBS ID checking?

In Uncategorized on August 13, 2018 at 10:00 am

From the 3rd September 2018 the documentation accepted for DBS checks for non-EEA nationals will be changing. This is to better align the system with Right to Work checks. The current guidelines will continue to run until 3rd December 2018 to allow employers a transition period to adjust their internal procedures.

The changes will apply to all levels of DBS check.

It will no longer be necessary to supply a Passport as an additional item to the following 3 documents:

  • A current Residence Card (including an Accession Residence Card or a Derivative Residence Card) issued by the Home Office to a non-European Economic Area national who is a family member of a national of a European Economic Area country or Switzerland or who has a derivative right of residence.
  • A current Immigration Status Document containing a photograph issued by the Home Office to the holder with a valid endorsement indicating that the named person may stay in the UK, and is allowed to do the type of work in question, together with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.
  • A current Immigration Status Document issued by the Home Office to the holder with an endorsement indicating that the named person is allowed to stay indefinitely in the UK or has no time limit on their stay in the UK, together with an official document giving the person’s permanent National Insurance number and their name issued by a Government agency or a previous employer.

The following documents  have been added to list of items that can be used as the Primary Document for non-EEA nationals seeking paid employment:

  • A Permanent Residence Card issued by the Home Office to the family member of a national of a European Economic Area country or Switzerland – added to documents available for Non EE applicants.
  • A Positive Verification Notice issued by the Home Office Employer Checking Service to the employer or prospective employer, which indicates that the named person may stay in the UK and is permitted to do the work in question – added to documents available for Non EE applicants.

The document below has been added to  the Group 2b document options for all applicant types (UK, EEA and non-EEA nationals):

  • Irish Passport Card

Guidance on the list of supporting documents that can be used by countersignatories in the ID checking process can be found at www.gov.uk/government/publications/dbs-identity-checking-guidelines/id-checking-guidelines-for-countersignatory-applications 

Do you need advice regarding your employee screening processes? Contact RBA to discuss how we can help. 

Rob Bryan Associates Limited Main Office: 01462 732444  rob@robertbryan.co.uk 

 

 

Hard Talking

In Uncategorized on July 11, 2018 at 10:59 am

Tough Talk

Often in the workplace a time comes for something to be said. Red wine gets better with age, but unattended people issues are more like a prawn sandwich left out of the fridge!

So face up to the issue

Generally, problems arise when people’s standards and expectations are out of line. Your aim is for a clear understanding of what must change and by when.

Prepare

Get your facts and evidence before you start.

Pick your time

Find a proper time and place to have your discussion – NEVER text or email. Make space for a two-way dialogue.

Set out the issue

State facts and observations – reserve your opinions for another day. Get an understanding of the other person’s perspective. Identify the skills or performance shortfall. Don’t generalise, be specific and use actual examples.

Listen

Does the other person get it? They may have been unaware of any issue. There could be a reason why performance has declined? Other things could be getting in the way.

Explain what good looks like

Stress the need for improvement. State what needs to be done and by when.

Clarify understanding

Confirm agreed actions in a memo or email. Plan to review and repeat as required.

 

Are you an employer needing advice on people management? Contact RBA to discuss how we can help.

Rob Bryan Associates Limited Main Office: 01462 732444  www.robbryanassociates.org.uk

Heatwave Hot Tips

In Uncategorized on June 28, 2018 at 9:00 am

The good weather helps put a smile on people’s faces, but it can also raise a number of workplace issues.

Here are some tips to help you:

• You may hear from employees, “it’s too hot to work, you have to send us home.” However, the Workplace Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations 1992 state a reasonable temperature must be maintained at work. There is no mention of a maximum! In very hot weather you need to carry out a risk assessment. This should look at the environment, type of work being carried out and the impact on any staff with particular needs, such as a pregnant employee. You should then address any issues. For example, could outside workers start earlier or later to avoid the midday sun?

• Faced with employees arguing that wearing a low-cut dress or shorts and flip flops will keep them cool when it’s ‘too hot’? Perhaps it’s time to relax the dress code a little, but standards of decency must be maintained. So, no very short skirts or shorts. Casual, smart, loose-fitting clothing, and a temporary relaxing of suits and ties so that the company image is maintained may be more appropriate. If staff work outside, watch out for them failing to wear protective clothing to keep cool. High-factor sun cream for those working outdoors would also be a sensible approach.

• Use fans and try keeping blinds closed. Have plenty of cold water available so staff remain hydrated.

• The warm weather can increase the risk of sickness. However, don’t jump to conclusions regarding an employee’s sickness absence on a hot sunny day as they may have sunstroke or hayfever. We always recommend that you should carry out a return-to-work interview.

Although some employees may believe a bit of sun relaxes the workplace rules, you need to manage consistently and fairly.

 

Avoid Scoring a Workplace Own Goal During the World Cup

In Uncategorized on June 21, 2018 at 6:33 am

World Cup

The second round of matches of the World Cup is underway. Dreams are still alive for almost all the teams, and employers are already reporting an increase in absence as football fever takes hold.

But how can employers maintain productivity without being kill-joys? Can you boost morale by allowing staff to participate?

A Flexible Approach

  • One way to facilitate employees following the World Cup is to allow games to be screened or listened to in the work place if your type of business allows. Remember not all employees will be fans so consider a football free zone as well.
  • Allow employees to start or finish earlier or work later to fit in around key games.
  • Consider your internet/social media/mobile phone policy – can this be relaxed to allow employees to follow the game?

Annual Leave Requests

  • More organised fans may have already requested time off but as teams progress to the next round you may get a flurry of leave requests. Follow your usual policy and be fair and consistent in how requests are granted.

Absence

  • An employee calls in sick or fails to arrive on the day of the big game? Follow your usual procedures.

Hungover Staff

  • Football and a few drinks often go hand in hand. But what if your employees are turning up for work in an unfit state? Again, your usual policy should be followed. You should also have a policy in place regarding drinking during working hours.

And as we head to the final whistle…

  • Don’t forget it’s not all about England. You may have staff supporting a number of different teams so make sure any flexible arrangements include them as well.
  • Some people hate football! Avoid them becoming resentful by being open in your communications and not allowing them to have an increased work load due to others taking advantage of a flexible working approach.

 

If you need advice on developing or implementing your workplace policies RBA would be pleased to hear from you.

 

Rob Bryan Associates Limited Main Office: 01462 732444 www.robbryanassociates.org.uk

Mary’s Baby is due on the 25th

In Uncategorized on December 13, 2016 at 3:01 pm

A Christmas message (on the lighter side!)

Mary’s baby is due on 25th December, so what is an employer to do?

Joseph needed to take time off to accompany Mary to an ante natal visit. Whilst Joseph was “surprised” to find Mary was pregnant (and there may be some doubt as to whether Joseph is the biological father), if he is in relationship with Mary then it would be appropriate for his employer Carpenter’s R Us to allow him time off for this. There would be no requirement however for this to be paid.

Mary will be entitled to have up to 52 weeks’ maternity leave. She must take off the two weeks following the birth of the baby, this period is “compulsory maternity leave. Mary has been employed for 9 months now and has provided a MatB1 form. Providing Mary’s average earnings exceeded the threshold for 8 weeks before the 15th week before the expected birth she will be eligible to receive Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP) for 39 weeks. For the first six weeks of leave Mary will receive 90% of her earnings from her employer.

Mary is about to go on a trip to Bethlehem. We understand that this is due to the census. Whilst the Roman’s failed to pass the necessary Statutory Instrument to create any extra public or bank holiday we are advising all employers that travel should be allowed to travel to fulfil this “public duty” Whether this will be paid will depend on the employment contract. As a separate aside, careful consideration should be given to whether Mary is fit to travel by donkey in the 35th week of pregnancy. Employers should consider completing a Risk Assessment for employees who inform them of their pregnancy.

This week Mary has said she would like to book holiday from Wednesday to take all her remaining holiday for this year. Mary has questioned what will happen to her 5.6 weeks’ holiday next year if she has the whole year off? We suggest Mary’s employer communicates with Mary on a periodic basis throughout the leave period to inform her of any company changes or news. If Mary wishes to return from leave early she will need to provide her employer a minimum of 8 weeks’ notice. Regarding her holiday whilst on leave, she will continue to accrue her holiday during this period. Any remaining holiday that is not used should be carried over to the next holiday year.

Mary has offered to help her employer on a casual “as and when required” basis for festival catering engagements over 2017. Can she do this work whilst on Maternity Leave? The employer and employee can agree to up to 10 Keeping in Touch (KIT) Days this would allow Mary to work and be paid for these days. Any other work for the employer would bring the Maternity leave to an end.

What happens next Christmas? Mary has the right to return to her job as before if she returns after the first 26 weeks (ordinary leave) period. If Mary takes leave up to next Christmas, then she will be entitled to her old job, or if that is not practical, a job on “no less favourable terms”

The Employer thinks that being the mother of the baby Jesus may be a “bit of a handful” and Mary has committed to do whatever she can for her child whether she likes it or not! What if she can’t cope? Can she work part time?

For some time, parents of children under 18 and carers could request changes to their employment terms. This has now been extended to all employees. Mary does not need to wait until the birth of her child to make a request. We suggest the employer arranges to discuss this with Mary giving a written response in good time (but no less than 3 months). The employee has a right to request changes but cannot demand changes! There are specific reasons why a flexible working request can be refused.

Joseph has apparently mentioned to Mary that Carpenters R Us have a special enhanced Maternity policy and thinks that if he was a woman there, then he could take 6 months leave with full pay. Can Mary and Joseph share their leave? A recent court case has highlighted that where parents share leave an employee may well be able to bring a sex discrimination claim, where a man and woman would be treated differently in the same circumstances. Any employer who offers enhanced maternity terms should be well advised to consider what Paternity and Parental leave terms are offered.

 

RBA wishes all our clients and partners a Very Merry Christmas.

This month’s employment focus on the RBA website looks at Maternity issues in the workplace and includes out frequently asked questions  factsheet. The link can be found at http://www.robbryanassociates.org.uk/2016/12/12/focus-on-maternity/

 

Rob Bryan LLM MA FCIPD TechIOSH
Rob Bryan Associates Limited
Tele/Fax 01462 732444

Email rob@robertbryan.co.uk
Mob 07801 223867
robbryanassociates.org.uk