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Posts Tagged ‘absence’

Be Ready for Bad Weather

In absence, business principles, contracts, Employment law, family, pay, Uncategorized on November 25, 2021 at 10:06 am

Snow. Love it or hate it, if you’re an employer bad weather can cause all sorts of problems. It pays to be prepared.

As we approach the end of a mild November, low temperatures and the possibility of ice and snow are forecast across much of the country. Indeed, bad weather such as flooding or severe winds can disrupt work at any time of the year. Here are some of the common questions employers ask us:

What if the workplace can’t open?

If the workplace can’t open, or there is no work available, staff are entitled to pay in full for any hours they would have worked, unless there is a contractual right to lay-off.

What if the workplace can still open?

If the workplace is able to open, staff are expected to try to make it in to work unless otherwise informed by their employer. If they do not arrive at work they are not entitled to pay.

You also have a responsibility to make sure the workplace is safe for staff to attend. Paths may need to be gritted, for example.

What if employees are unable to travel to work?

There may be travel disruption which makes it difficult or impossible for staff to arrive at work on time, if at all. There is no legal obligation for employees to be paid for time they have missed but alternatives such as making up the time could be offered. Employees should inform their workplace as soon as possible if they are going to be absent or delayed. The employer also needs to consider their duty of care in asking employers to attend the workplace in dangerous weather. Extra consideration may need to be given if you have an employee who is at extra risk e.g. if they are pregnant or have a disability.

If employees are unable to travel to work consider the alternatives:

  • Working from home
  • Flexible start/finish time
  • Working from an alternative site
  • Using annual leave
  • Using banked time-in-lieu
  • Making up the time at a later date

What if schools are closed?

Employees may be absent if their children are unable to attend school or if they are carers and a nurse does not arrive. Employees have a statutory right to a reasonable amount of time off to deal with emergency situations involving dependants and this will cover the breakdown in care arrangements. This time off is usually unpaid, although this will depend on the organisation’s policy. Employees should keep their manager informed of the situation.

Be Prepared:

  • We advise that you include a ‘Bad Weather Policy’ in your Employment Handbook so that management and staff are clear on your company’s protocol should severe weather strike.
  • If you already have a policy make sure staff are aware of it in advance of expected bad weather
  • Consider how you can communicate with your workforce in the event of severe weather

If you would like guidance on implementing this in your workplace, contact us at Rob Bryan Associates Limited Main Office: 01462 732444  www.robbryanassociates.org.uk

What are the rules about self-isolation and pay?

In absence, covid-19, pay, Uncategorized on September 27, 2021 at 10:42 am

Sick pay for self-isolation

Staff must be paid at least Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) if they cannot work because they’re self-isolating for any of the following reasons:

  • they have coronavirus (COVID-19) symptoms or have tested positive
  • they are not fully vaccinated and someone in their household has symptoms or has tested positive
  • they are told to self-isolate by an NHS test and trace service
  • they have been advised by their doctor to stay at home before going into hospital for surgery

To be eligible for SSP, they must be off work for at least 4 days in a row, including any of their usual non-working days.

They’re entitled to be paid at least SSP for every day they’re off work. This is different to the usual rules for SSP where the first 3 days are unpaid waiting days.

Pay for self-isolating or quarantine after travel

Employees are not entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) if they’re in self-isolation or in quarantine after travel abroad in circumstances where they cannot work from home. But the employer could choose to make up their pay if they wanted to.

Managing Holidays

In absence, contracts, holiday, Uncategorized on September 27, 2021 at 10:38 am

Holiday management is often overlooked, and the end of the holiday year brings a raft of requests from employees trying to use their holiday up or risk losing it. This year has also been made somewhat more complex with furlough leave and the government allowing the right to carry over the first four weeks of annual leave into the next two leave years; this applies where it was not reasonably practicable for the leave to be taken.

You should ensure that an employee is able to take as much of their leave as possible in the year to which it relates. Ideally you should keep a track on how much leave all of your staff have left to take at regular intervals throughout the leave year and remind them that they should book their leave otherwise they may lose it.

You can also require employees to take leave on dates that are convenient for you. Again, this can either be set out in the written contract of employment e.g. an annual shutdown or at other times during the year. However, if dates are not stipulated in the contract you must give employees notice which is equal to twice the length of the leave in question e.g. a minimum two weeks’ notice for one week’s leave. Many employers did do this during periods of furlough leave to ensure holidays were being taken and a problem was not building up.

Now is a good time to remind employees to book any remaining holiday to help ensure you do not have to refuse requests or allow carry over to another holiday year.

Next year also brings an additional bank holiday to mark the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee on Friday 3 June. Additionally, May Day will be moved to Thursday 2 June, in effect creating a four-day weekend for the event. 

Whether employers will need to permit staff to take this day will depend upon their contract of employment and if you need any assistance with this, please contact your consultant.

Be Ready for Bad Weather

In Employment law on January 10, 2019 at 10:51 am

automobile-car-close-up-730901

So far, this winter has been fairly mild but as we head into January, we can expect low temperatures and the possibility of ice and snow. Indeed, bad weather such as flooding or severe winds can disrupt work at any time of the year. It pays to be prepared.

If the workplace is able to open, staff are expected to try to make it in to work unless otherwise informed by their employer. If they do not arrive at work they are not entitled to pay.

Employees who do arrive ready to work have the right to be paid. However, there may be no work available or there may be a need to temporarily shut down.

An individual’s ability to get to work may depend on factors beyond their control. Perhaps there is travel disruption, safety concerns or there are issues with dependants such as school closures. Employers need to consider:

  • how all staff can be treated fairly,
  • an incident / emergency communications plan
  • what plans can ensure business continuity.

Some employers offer:

  • home working
  • short notice annual leave
  • using banked time-in-lieu
  • opportunities to make up the lost time

Action:

  • We advise that you include a ‘Bad Weather Policy’ in your Employment Handbook so that management and staff are clear on your company’s protocol should severe weather strike.
  • Consider how you can communicate with your workforce in the event of severe weather

If you would like guidance on implementing this in your workplace, contact us at Rob Bryan Associates Limited Main Office: 01462 732444  www.robbryanassociates.org.uk

 

Avoid Scoring a Workplace Own Goal During the World Cup

In Uncategorized on June 21, 2018 at 6:33 am

World Cup

The second round of matches of the World Cup is underway. Dreams are still alive for almost all the teams, and employers are already reporting an increase in absence as football fever takes hold.

But how can employers maintain productivity without being kill-joys? Can you boost morale by allowing staff to participate?

A Flexible Approach

  • One way to facilitate employees following the World Cup is to allow games to be screened or listened to in the work place if your type of business allows. Remember not all employees will be fans so consider a football free zone as well.
  • Allow employees to start or finish earlier or work later to fit in around key games.
  • Consider your internet/social media/mobile phone policy – can this be relaxed to allow employees to follow the game?

Annual Leave Requests

  • More organised fans may have already requested time off but as teams progress to the next round you may get a flurry of leave requests. Follow your usual policy and be fair and consistent in how requests are granted.

Absence

  • An employee calls in sick or fails to arrive on the day of the big game? Follow your usual procedures.

Hungover Staff

  • Football and a few drinks often go hand in hand. But what if your employees are turning up for work in an unfit state? Again, your usual policy should be followed. You should also have a policy in place regarding drinking during working hours.

And as we head to the final whistle…

  • Don’t forget it’s not all about England. You may have staff supporting a number of different teams so make sure any flexible arrangements include them as well.
  • Some people hate football! Avoid them becoming resentful by being open in your communications and not allowing them to have an increased work load due to others taking advantage of a flexible working approach.

 

If you need advice on developing or implementing your workplace policies RBA would be pleased to hear from you.

 

Rob Bryan Associates Limited Main Office: 01462 732444 www.robbryanassociates.org.uk