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Posts Tagged ‘employment’

Dressed for Work?

In Uncategorized on June 28, 2016 at 8:14 pm

When summer does arrive in the UK employers often begin to notice more relaxed dress standards. Now is the time to remind employees of your guidelines on what you regard as acceptable. Dress codes should help Manager’s avoid misunderstandings with employees about what attire is considered appropriate for the work place. Written guidelines will also assist Manager’s in enforcing dress codes in a consistent, non-discriminatory manner.

Employers establish dress codes for a variety of reasons, including to present a positive image to clients, to prohibit employees from coming to work with offensive, distracting, or inappropriate attire, and to avoid clothing that would present a health and safety risk. While business attire was the norm at companies for many years, employers have relaxed dress codes in an effort to improve morale and retention. Casual dress policies have become more common at work in response to employees’ demands for flexibility and a relaxed work environment.

We would advise having clear, fair and enforceable policies on dress in the workplace. You also need to ensure that your workplace actions and expectations are not discriminatory.

You have probably recently seen in the press reference to the London receptionist sent home for not wearing heels. You can understand how a number of professions have to wear particular pieces of uniform for health and safety reasons, but for what logical reasons should women be required to wear high heels?
As the law stands, employers can dismiss staff who fail to live up to “reasonable” dress code demands, as long as they’ve been given enough time to buy the right shoes and clothes. They can set up different codes for men and women, as long as there’s an “equivalent level of smartness”.

Aside from the reasons above, employers should be aware that by dictating dress codes to women, they could find themselves at the wrong end of a discriminations claim if an employee was treated “less favorably” than a colleague of the opposite sex as a result. Simply, where the dress code could result in some disadvantage to the female employee which other male employees do not face, they may have a case on the grounds of sex discrimination

Employers are right to insist that their staff are presentable, neat and professional and appropriately dressed for work, but should not insist that females wear high heels to conduct their working day or shift.

There has also been in the press, details of a Belgian case regarding the treatment of religious observance and dress in the workplace.

In Achbita v G4S Secure Solutions NV the employee – a Muslim woman – was dismissed for insisting on wearing a hijab (or headscarf) when at work. The employer had a blanket rule forbidding any customer-facing employee from wearing visible religious symbols or dress in order to preserve a strict ‘neutrality’ in its dealings with customers. The Belgian Court referred the matter to the European Court of Justice asking whether a dismissal in such circumstances amounted to direct discrimination.

The case has yet to be decided however, it is unlikely that a UK Employment Tribunal could be persuaded that a policy of ‘neutrality’ is a sufficient reason to dismiss a Muslim woman who feels a religious obligation to wear the hijab at work.
Any dress code should be non-discriminatory and should apply to both men and women equally. If you need help to review your dress code please contact us and we can ensure that your workplace policies are not discriminatory and appropriate for your business.

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Unemployment figures updated

In Uncategorized on July 19, 2012 at 10:51 am

The Office for National Statistics has today announced the latest unemployment figures. In the 3 months to May 2012 the jobless figure fell 65,000 to end at 2.58 million.

The number of people employed rose in the same period by 181,000 to 29.35 million which is the biggest increase since 2010.

The government has placed much emphasis on the employment of young people. Unemployment for 16-24 year olds fell by 10,000 to 1.02 million.

Dispute the overall fall in jobless numbers the long term unemployed, those who have not worked for two years or more has increased to 441,000 the highest level since 1997.

Earnings

Average earning rose in the year to May by 1.5%. The average wage for UK workers excluding bonuses stood at £442 per week.

Rob Bryan Associates Limited
For all your Employment Matters
Link to Website

Qualifying period for unfair dismissal claims becomes two years

In Uncategorized on March 30, 2012 at 1:48 pm

For employers it is important to note that despite the headline for this change in employment law due to take effect from 6 April 2012 the detail is crucial.

Employees who commence their new job on or after 6 April will require two year’s service before being able to bring a claim for unfair dismissal in the Employment Tribunal.

Therefore all existing employees will be able to make an unfair dismissal claim in the normal way providing that they have one year’s service. In reality this means that there will be a year of transition between the two requirements.

The current maximum award for an employee at an Employment Tribunal is £72,300.

Rob Bryan Associates
http://www.robbryanassociates.org.uk
robbryan@mac.com

New rates of statutory maternity pay and sick pay

In Uncategorized on March 29, 2012 at 11:48 am

From 9 April 2012 Statutory Maternity pay, Paternity, Additional Paternity, Adoption pay and Maternity Allowance will all increase from £128.73 to £135.45; and Statutory Sick pay will increase from £81.60 to £85.85.

Rob Bryan Associates
http://www.robbryanassociates.org.uk
robbryan@mac.com

Right to Request Flexible Working Extended to All Employees

In Uncategorized on March 3, 2011 at 1:25 pm

Right to Request Flexible Working Extended to All Employees

Key details

Due to come into effect from 30th June 2014, the right to request a flexible pattern of work is amended by:

  • extending the right to request flexible working to all employees (not just those with parental responsibility for a child, or caring responsibilities for an adult);
  • replacing the requirement for the employer to deal with the request in accordance with the statutory procedure with a requirement to “deal with the application in a reasonable manner”; and
  • requiring the employer to notify the employee of its decision within a “decision period” of three months of the application (or longer if this is agreed).

The 26-week qualifying period for employees to make a request for flexible working is retained along with the restriction that employees can only make one flexible working request in any 12-month period.

Acas has produced a draft non-statutory booklet that provides good practice guidance for employers in dealing with such requests and this can be accessed via the following link:

http://www.acas.org.uk/media/pdf/p/6/Handling-requests-to-work-flexibly-in-a-reasonable-manner-an-Acas-guide.pdf

The opening up of the eligibility criteria for the right to request flexible working is likely to lead to some fairly high profile coverage in the media nearer the implementation date, so employers are advised to prepare themselves for a possible influx of applications soon after 30th June 2014. Further advice and guidance on the subject can of course be obtained from your consultant.

Rob Bryan Associates
http://www.robbryanassociates.org.uk
rob@robertbryan.co.uk            chris@robertbryan.co.uk

 

Equality Act

In Uncategorized on July 5, 2010 at 11:43 pm

The Coalition government will be implementing the first stages of the Equality Act from 1 October 2010.

Is you organisation ready for the changes?

Discrimination definitions will be standardised across many different headings including; age, disability, gender reassignment,race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation, marriage or civil partnership and maternity and paternity.

See details at http://www.acas.org.uk/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=2840&p=0

Whilst traditionally discrimination was limited to actions against a person with specific personal characteristics – Discrimination by Association means new claims can now arise from a person’s ‘association’ with that person. i.e. discrimination against a parent with a disabled child or removing a job offer upon discovering an employee’s partner was black or gay.

So when did your organisation last review the diversity / equal opportunity policy or carry out any in house seminars for managers supervisors.

For more information and practical help go to http://www.robbryanassociates.org.uk

Rob Bryan LLM MA FCIPD MIOSH